Comment est-ce qu’on photographie la surveillance de masse ? | The Creators Project

By CG / On

[:en]Nouvelle série de Trevor Paglen sur le concept de machine vision, qui thématise la convergence entre données et images « photographiques » , et illustre littéralement la projection de Jonathan Crary dans L’art de l’observateur (1992) stipulant que « La formalisation et la diffusion d’images produites par des moyens informatiques préludent à l’invasion d’«espaces» visuels forgés de toutes pièces et sans commune mesure avec les pouvoirs mimétiques du cinéma, de la photographie et de la télévision ».

 

L’artiste américain Trevor Paglen documente depuis de longues années des sujets aussi abstraits qu’Internet, la protection des données ou les usages numériques.

Source : Comment est-ce qu’on photographie la surveillance de masse ? | The Creators Project[:fr]Nouvelle série de Trevor Paglen sur le concept de machine vision, qui thématise la convergence entre données et images « photographiques », et illustre littéralement la projection de Jonathan Crary dans L’art de l’observateur (1992) stipulant que « La formalisation et la diffusion d’images produites par des moyens informatiques préludent à l’invasion d’«espaces» visuels forgés de toutes pièces et sans commune mesure avec les pouvoirs mimétiques du cinéma, de la photographie et de la télévision ».

L’artiste américain Trevor Paglen documente depuis de longues années des sujets aussi abstraits qu’Internet, la protection des données ou les usages numériques.

Source : Comment est-ce qu’on photographie la surveillance de masse ? | The Creators Project[:]

Art|Basel 2015

By CG / On

“Lunar Surface”, NASA - Orbiter 4, 1967 silver gelatin print 172,5 x 45,4 cm, © NASA

La galerie Daniel Blau (Londres/Munich) expose les photographies de la lune prise en octobre 1967 par la sonde NASA Orbiter, transmises « numériquement » sur terre. Il s’agit des premières images photographiques enregistrées et transmises à distance automatiquement. Techniquement il s’agit de polaroids décomposés en valeurs binaires, puis recomposés par un ordinateur:  Lunar Surface – Daniel Blau

Chez RaebervonStenglin on trouve un projet original de Raphaël Hefti qui aborde ici la production automatisée (plutôt que la reproduction): à l’aide d’une fraise CNC de l’entreprise Schäublin, il réalise des sculptures en aluminium in situ – à Bâle – grâce aux techniques et au savoir-faire suisse au coeur de l’industrie horlogère, de l’armement ou des machines-outils, qui prolonge ces expérimentations récentes sur les matériaux. La représentation du processus, ici sur un écran de très haute résolution, complète la démarche d’une dimension réflexive: Sculptures made at Art Basel with Swiss machine precision.

 

“Lunar Surface”, NASA - Orbiter 4, 1967 silver gelatin print 172,5 x 45,4 cm, © NASALa galerie Daniel Blau (Londres/Munich) expose les photographies de la lune prise en octobre 1967 par la sonde NASA Orbiter, transmises « numériquement » sur terre. Il s’agit des premières images photographiques enregistrées et transmises à distance automatiquement. Techniquement il s’agit de polaroids décomposés en valeurs binaires, puis recomposés par un ordinateur:  Lunar Surface – Daniel Blau

Chez RaebervonStenglin on trouve un projet original de Raphaël Hefti qui aborde ici la production automatisée (plutôt que la reproduction): à l’aide d’une fraise CNC de l’entreprise Schäublin, il réalise des sculptures en aluminium in situ – à Bâle – grâce aux techniques et au savoir-faire suisse au coeur de l’industrie horlogère, de l’armement ou des machines-outils, qui prolonge ces expérimentations récentes sur les matériaux. La représentation du processus, ici sur un écran de très haute résolution, complète la démarche d’une dimension réflexive: Sculptures made at Art Basel with Swiss machine precision.

 

Gursky, Iron Man and the franchising of low culture by high culture

By CG / On

Andreas Gursky’s recent work on symptoms of globalisation, which has addressed F1 Racing, global fashion brands or high-rises in the United Arab Emirates, takes on an interesting turn with his recent interests in Marvel’s superheroes. In 2013 and 2014, the German photographer has created two of his signature digital tableaus, using as main characters of his large scale photographs, Iron Man and Super Man, in seemingly everyday situations. The images have been exhibited in the summer 2014 in the White Cube Gallery in London and in the Andreas Gursky, Jeff Wall, Neo Rauch show at the Kestnergesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, and are published in the Verlag für moderne Kunst catalogue of the Hanover show. I’m not so much concerned by the shows themselves (review of the London show for example on http://www.independent.co.uk), but by the diffusion on the web of the superhero images, more connected to the issues addressed by this blog. 

Reproduction of Andreas Gursky, SH I, 2013, 307 x 229 x 6.2 cm, taken from Heinrich Dietz & Veit Görner (ed.), « Gursky, Rauch, Wall », Verlag für moderne Kunst, Nürnberg, 2014

As an Art Newspaper article from 28 May 2015 reveals, documents from the Sony leak disclosed negotiations of Gagosian Gallery on behalf of Gursky, in order to secure the rights to use Marvel characters, such as Spiderman, Superman and Iron Man (details of the transaction here). As a consequence of these negotiations, it was forbidden to take pictures in both shows, which resulted in a very scarce presence of the photographs on the web. A quick Google image research only yielded one result of a partial shot of one of the images, published in an article about the Sony/Gagosian tractations on bleeding cool.com. While the « low » culture image of Marvel comics is familiar nowadays through a multitude of films, TV series, toys and merchandising, the « high » culture image is protected and hidden as if – once again – mechanical reproduction would fragilise the aura of the artwork. The question of widespread and often automatic diffusion of images throughout networks, often addressed in this blog, is here countered by legal considerations, which reveal an interesting shift in uses of images with similar source material, but which enter different contexts – and show the role of individuals and institutions, which control a seemingly automatic or autonomous diffusion.  

Promotional image for Iron Man 3, Marvel Studios, 2013
Promotional image for Iron Man 3, Marvel Studios, 2013, used by Andreas Gursky for SH I, 2013

 If Gursky has always produced images based on source images (rather than depicted « reality »)1, it is interesting to note that not only he here appropriates pre-existing material, which he has never done before (I think), but also explicitly addresses a fictional universe, aspect he has only hinted at in the past. Clearly, Gursky’s appropriative approach is reflexive and confronts what we could call the franchised image – it remains open to discussion if such a picturesque strategy participates in or comments such extended visual and narrative universes2.   

Reproduction of Andreas Gursky, SH IV, 2014, 307 x 226 x 6.2 cm, taken from Heinrich Dietz & Veit Görner (ed.), « Gursky, Rauch, Wall », Verlag für moderne Kunst, Nürnberg, 2014

  1 About this aspect of his work see my PhD (sorry for quoting myself) From objectivist paradigm to new documentary forms. digital technologies in the work of Thomas Ruff, Andreas Gursky and Jörg Sasse, University of Lausanne, 2014 (see https://www.swissbib.ch)

2 About such « worlds in expansion » see especially Alain Boillat, « Star Wars », un monde en expansion, Les Collections de la Maison d’Ailleurs 3, ActuSF ; Maison d’Ailleurs, Chambéry ; Yverdon-les-Bains, 2014.

 

Andreas Gursky’s recent work on symptoms of globalisation, which has addressed F1 Racing, global fashion brands or high-rises in the United Arab Emirates, takes on an interesting turn with his recent interests in Marvel’s superheroes. In 2013 and 2014, the German photographer has created two of his signature digital tableaus, using as main characters of his large scale photographs, Iron Man and Super Man, in seemingly everyday situations. The images have been exhibited in the summer 2014 in the White Cube Gallery in London and in the Andreas Gursky, Jeff Wall, Neo Rauch show at the Kestnergesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, and are published in the Verlag für moderne Kunst catalogue of the Hanover show. I’m not so much concerned by the shows themselves (review of the London show for example on http://www.independent.co.uk), but by the diffusion on the web of the superhero images, more connected to the issues addressed by this blog. 

Reproduction of Andreas Gursky, SH I, 2013, 307 x 229 x 6.2 cm, taken from Heinrich Dietz & Veit Görner (ed.), « Gursky, Rauch, Wall », Verlag für moderne Kunst, Nürnberg, 2014

As an Art Newspaper article from 28 May 2015 reveals, documents from the Sony leak disclosed negotiations of Gagosian Gallery on behalf of Gursky, in order to secure the rights to use Marvel characters, such as Spiderman, Superman and Iron Man (details of the transaction here). As a consequence of these negotiations, it was forbidden to take pictures in both shows, which resulted in a very scarce presence of the photographs on the web. A quick Google image research only yielded one result of a partial shot of one of the images, published in an article about the Sony/Gagosian tractations on bleeding cool.com. While the « low » culture image of Marvel comics is familiar nowadays through a multitude of films, TV series, toys and merchandising, the « high » culture image is protected and hidden as if – once again – mechanical reproduction would fragilise the aura of the artwork. The question of widespread and often automatic diffusion of images throughout networks, often addressed in this blog, is here countered by legal considerations, which reveal an interesting shift in uses of images with similar source material, but which enter different contexts – and show the role of individuals and institutions, which control a seemingly automatic or autonomous diffusion. 

Promotional image for Iron Man 3, Marvel Studios, 2013
Promotional image for Iron Man 3, Marvel Studios, 2013, used by Andreas Gursky for SH I, 2013

If Gursky has always produced images based on source images (rather than depicted « reality »)1, it is interesting to note that not only he here appropriates pre-existing material, which he has never done before (I think), but also explicitly addresses a fictional universe, aspect he has only hinted at in the past. Clearly, Gursky’s appropriative approach is reflexive and confronts what we could call the franchised image – it remains open to discussion if such a picturesque strategy participates in or comments such extended visual and narrative universes2.   

Reproduction of Andreas Gursky, SH IV, 2014, 307 x 226 x 6.2 cm, taken from Heinrich Dietz & Veit Görner (ed.), « Gursky, Rauch, Wall », Verlag für moderne Kunst, Nürnberg, 2014

 

 1 About this aspect of his work see my PhD (sorry for quoting myself) From objectivist paradigm to new documentary forms. digital technologies in the work of Thomas Ruff, Andreas Gursky and Jörg Sasse, University of Lausanne, 2014 (see https://www.swissbib.ch)

2 About such « worlds in expansion » see especially Alain Boillat, « Star Wars », un monde en expansion, Les Collections de la Maison d’Ailleurs 3, ActuSF ; Maison d’Ailleurs, Chambéry ; Yverdon-les-Bains, 2014. 

The Smart Landscape: Intelligent Architecture by Rem Koolhaas – artforum.com / in print

By CG / On

Discussion stimulante de Rem Koolhaas sur automatisation, culture numérique et architecture dans le dernier numéro d’Artforum: « auparavant, les éléments architecturaux étaient sourds et muets – on pouvait leur faire confiance. Maintenant, beaucoup d’entres eux écoutent, pensent, et répondent. »  THE SMART LANDSCAPE: INTELLIGENT ARCHITECTURE by Rem Koolhaas – artforum.com / in print.

pplkpr

By CG / On

Pplkpr, nouvelle application (et accessoirement projet artistique), propose d’optimiser vos relations sociales en analysant vos données corporelles (battement du coeur, etc.):  « tracks, analyzes, and auto-manages your relationships ». Fascinant.

p.s: l’app proposait par ailleurs, mi mars 2015, la transmission du battement du coeur de Shia LaBeouf…

 

 

 

Pplkpr, nouvelle application (et accessoirement projet artistique), propose d’optimiser vos relations sociales en analysant vos données corporelles (battement du coeur, etc.):  « tracks, analyzes, and auto-manages your relationships ». Fascinant.

p.s: l’app proposait par ailleurs, mi mars 2015, la transmission du battement du coeur de Shia LaBeouf… 

 

Leaked Palantir Doc Reveals Uses, Specific Functions And Key Clients | TechCrunchPalantir

By CG / On

Leaked Palantir Doc Reveals Uses, Specific Functions And Key Clients | TechCrunch.

palantir
Logo Palantir

Le site TechCruch se penche sur l’entreprise Palantir, qui fournit des logiciels d’analyses de données, utilisés par différents agences gouvernementales américaines (LAPD, CIA, FBI, etc.). Le logiciel traite une quantité importante de données grâce à des algorithmes, décelant des schémas comporte-mentaux suspects; dans la finance par exemple, où l’analyse des transactions devrait permettre de découvrir des délits d’initiés. 

Capture d’écran 2015-01-13 à 14.17.55
Produits proposés par Palantir (capture d’écran, palantir.com)

 

Leaked Palantir Doc Reveals Uses, Specific Functions And Key Clients | TechCrunch.

Actuellement exposé au Musée de l’Elysée (Lausanne), le travail de Mari Bastashevski aborde une problématique similaire: sa série State Business s’interroge sur les industriels qui fournissent des solutions de surveillance à des états. Les images montrées à L’Elysée abordent l’utilisation, par l’Ouzbékistan et le Kazakhstan, de technologies de surveillance des conversations téléphoniques, développées par des entreprises israéliennes. Plus d’infos sur son site.